Weed Warrior Training

Wed, 09/27/2017 - 5:00pm - 7:30pm

FREE TRAINING!

Become a certified Montgomery Parks Weed Warrior!

Join us in the Little Falls Stream Valley Park to learn to identify and remove the invasive plants that are strangling our native vegetation.

You must pre-register for this training.  Click HERE to register. You will recieve a confirmation notice with training location from Tenley Wurglitz during business hours.  There is no charge for the training.  

5:00 to 5:30:  Light dinner and introduction to Little Falls Watershed Alliance with Sarah Morse, Executive Director, LFWA

5:30 to 7:30:  Weed Warrior Training with TenleyWurglitz and Carole Bergmann, Montgomery Parks

More information on the Weed Warrior Progarm HERE

or

Contact Tenley Wurglitz
Weed Warrior Volunteer Coordinator
Office: 301-962-1357
Cell: 301-461-4016
Tenley.Wurglitz@montgomeryparks.org

 

LFWA Volunteer Tackling Porcelainberry Vines in Norwood Park

A unique approach to non-native invasive plants in Montgomery Parks

By whatever name you call them, non-native invasive plants (NNIs), alien invasive plants, or exotic invasive plants - the key word is invasive. These plants did not evolve in North American ecosystems and they have become too successful at reproducing.They are threats to native flora, fauna, soils, and water regimes throughout the United States and they have become a region-wide problem in recent years.

In Montgomery Parks (a system of almost 34,000 acres) non-native invasive plants (NNIs) have begun to invade park edges, woodlands and shady forests, meadows and other open spaces, trail corridors, and waterways. NNIs compete with desirable plants for light, water, and nutrients. They have been introduced into an environment that is free of the vast and complex array of natural controls present in their native lands (including herbivores, insects, parasites, and pathogens) that would otherwise limit their reproduction and spread.

To respond to the NNIs problem Carole Bergmann, Montgomery Parks Forest Ecologist, created Weed Warriors in 1999 to educate citizens about identification and management of NNIs. Weed Warrior volunteers have logged more than 25,000 hours to date and made a valuable contribution to the control of non-native invasive vegetation in county parks.